Two-fifths of Britons are now more motivated to do home improvements after the lockdown

An almost universal consensus (nine out of ten Britons) said that their home is important to make their life better, and 57 percent feel it is even more significant post-lockdown. 

This is a main conclusion of a research, commissioned by B&Q, that polled 2.000 consumers to uncover how the Covid-19 lockdown has fundamentally changed Brits’ relationship with their homes. 

Exploring why homes felt more significant than ever, the survey also found that 89 percent say their homes are a ”sanctuary” where they can be ourselves and 87 percent value the sense of security they provide. 

Despite this, only one in ten (11 percent) currently live in their ideal home, whereas half of the population (47 percent) want to make changes to their living set up.

The research also showed that the increased time spent at home meant over half (53 percent) of Brits realised more DIY needed doing. 

And it seems the benefits go far beyond the functional bricks and mortar. During what was a difficult time for many, over half (51 percent) also said they found home improvement projects to be therapeutic. 

Over two-fifths (42 percent) say they are more motivated to do DIY as a result of lockdown, and 35 percent feel more ambitious in the home improvement projects they want to tackle.

This change in attitude is particularly prevalent among youngsters, with two-fifths (42 percent) of 18-24 year olds having learned DIY skills during lockdown, while only a quarter (24 per cent) of those aged between 45-54 said the same.

The younger generation also now feel more ambitious to make changes and tackle further DIY (42 percent of 18-24 year olds and 45 percent of 25-34 year olds agreed).

Gardening and decorating projects are by far the most coveted projects to improve people’s lives and enjoyment of their home.

Nearly half (48 percent) said they had a gardening project planned and 43 percent want to get underway with decorating tasks.

Signs of the lasting impact of lockdown on our home habits is also clear, with more than a third (35 percent) planning to improve their working from home spaces.

- advertisment -